To Make The Sale, Leave

To Make the Sale, Leave

By: Josh Seibert, Sandler Training®
  

The STORY:

Nick was having trouble trying to close the prospect. Still never having attended any company sales training courses, he hit upon a solution to the problem. One of the most experienced salespeople was in the back, and Nick decided to go and ask his advice.

“If you could excuse me for one moment,” Nick said, “I just remembered that I have an important message for one of the other fellows who is in the back room . . . I forgot to give it to him earlier.”

“You are going to come back, aren’t you?” asked the prospect.

“Of course,” responded Nick, “why would you think I wouldn’t?”

“Oh, I know I’m a royal pain in the butt when it comes to making a decision about buying something,” responded the prospect. “Most of the time, the salespeople get tired of trying to convince me and wander away, and I never see them again.”

Nick wasn’t sure what to say. He really needed to get the experienced salesperson’s advice so he turned and headed toward the back room.

“Wait a minute,” said the prospect, “I don’t want you to leave. I’ll buy it.”

“You’re sure?” asked Nick, hoping he hadn’t said too much.

“Definitely. Wrap it up.”

When the customer is out the door, thought Nick, I’ll go back and ask the experienced salesperson what to do the next time this happens.

The RESULT:

Nick did something very important for the wrong reason. From the prospect’s point of view, which is the only one that counts in selling, Nick was getting up to leave, never to be seen again. Again, the prospect would be left standing alone, not having bought anything. This pressure on the prospect, which Nick applied without realizing it, was enough to make the prospect give up and buy. Unfortunately, if Nick does ask for advice, he’ll probably be told the wrong thing.

DISCUSSION:

Getting up and leaving a prospect is almost impossible for a salesperson to consider. Why would you ever want to give the impression that you are going to walk out the door?

The reason for getting up and leaving is to let the prospect know it is time to make a decision.

The pressure is now on the prospect where it belongs.

This is not a tactic that you want to try with every prospect you come across. But if you have reached the “end of your rope” with one, you have nothing to lose by trying. The worst that could happen is you won’t make the sale. But then, you had no chance anyway.

APPROACH:

There are many ways to get up and leave. One approach is to physically start to move away.

Another is to simply look at the prospect and say, “Off the record . . . I get the impression that you haven’t come to a decision. Let’s assume that you decide it’s over. You don’t buy. What happens now?”

This verbal getting up and leaving forces the prospect to see a future in which he does not have your product/service. If he is in enough pain to be seriously considering buying, then looking at a future without buying is more painful. The only catch to the verbal leaving is that you MUST wait for a response. Do not rescue him or physically leave him.

Do not change “What happens now?” to “What happens then?” The word “now” brings the future, without your product/service, into the present, and as a result, pressure to decide becomes overwhelming.

THOUGHT:

“Leaving” the prospect makes the prospect want to come to a decision.

 

Josh Seibert is the president of Training & Development Solutions, Inc., Sandler Training located in the Piedmont Triad.  He can be reached at 336-884-1348 or www.training.sandler.com

©Sandler Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

The Key to Marketing Your Insurance Agency? Develop a Process, Follow Through, Be Accountable, & Get Help if You Need It

Key to Success - Wood

The Key to Marketing Your Insurance Agency? Develop a Process, Follow Through, Be Accountable, & Get Help if You Need It
By: Michael Miller, Smart Choice® State Director

As an independent agent, it’s easy to get so caught up in your business that you forget to work on your business. But, if we fail to continuously develop and close leads, eventually, our agencies will suffer.

That’s why I encourage insurance agents to create a formal, repeatable sales process for selling and cross-selling all lines of insurance. With proper follow up and support, such a process can keep leads and prospects coming in the door.

Develop a formal, repeatable sales process.

As the state director for Smart Choice® MN, WI & IA, I offer my agents training on a marketing system that develops formal, repeatable processes for each insurance line. We start with defining an agent’s sales goals and then create a process to meet those goals. Specific action items empower agents to generate leads and close more business.

Here are some action items that have proven effective for myself and the agents I work with:

  • sending direct mail letters
  • tapping the power of digital marketing tools, such as social media and email
  • making follow-up phone calls and call scripts
  • using fact-finder sheets to guide the conversation in initial client meetings
  • cross-line selling other insurance products
  • sending thank you cards
  • requoting old leads

Whatever action items you choose, write down your process and review your steps to make sure it’s repeatable.

Follow through with your sales process & be accountable for each step.

Even the most thoughtful and efficient process is ineffective if you don’t put it to use. Now that you have the steps in place to develop your agency’s prospects, you need to follow through. Block out time on your calendar to complete every action item. Ask a staff member to remind you to work through each step. Consider delegating tasks to staff members, too.

Get help if you need it.

Sometimes, relying on staff just isn’t enough to make your process successful. If this happens to you, consider calling in some outside help. A business coach or mentor can be a helpful partner in the sale process. So can a formal marketing system.

3 Questions To Ask Your Prospects To Eliminate Price Objections And Sell More Insurance Policies

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3 QUESTIONS TO ASK YOUR PROSPECTS TO ELIMINATE PRICE OBJECTIONS AND SELL MORE INSURANCE POLICIES
BY: MICHAEL MILLER, SMART CHOICE® STATE DIRECTOR

In my recent article, “The Art of the Close,” I discussed how I coach insurance agents to close on value versus cost. I don’t leave my close until the end of my meeting with a prospect. The entire meeting is the close. I use a comprehensive client profile to help prospects identify and understand the risks they face. The profile gives me the chance to sell on value, not cost, as well as the opportunity to cross sell my products.

As we complete the profile together, I’m able to ask my prospects specific questions about how they plan to pay for unexpected events. This almost always eliminates the price objection because prospects’ own answers to my questions provide the reason to buy on value.

Here are three questions I ask to help my clients see the value of comprehensive insurance coverage.

  1. If you hit and seriously injure an uninsured motorist, how would you prefer to pay for his or her medical bills?

Most people don’t realize they’re personally on the hook for medical expenses over and beyond what their policy covers. Explaining this and then asking what they’re comfortable paying for out of pocket makes it easy to sell adequate liability, under-insured, and uninsured motorist coverage.

  1. If you died tomorrow, how much money would your wife/husband need to pay for your funeral arrangements and cover monthly expenses?

This is a great question to get auto and home prospects to consider purchasing life insurance. Prospects are already thinking about what they need to cover injury and their physical property. This question can lead to a conversation on how life insurance protects and provides for their families.

  1. What is your plan for protecting your assets in the event of a lawsuit against you?

Most prospects don’t have an answer for this question, which makes it an effective way to cross sell umbrella policies.